Lost Bird

From: Marianne Oliveira Subject: Lost Bird Message Body: Just discovered my husband hadn’t paid the fee to join and he just put it in the mail!! This is the Oliveira from 2405 Craghead Lane. Our African Gray parrot Duke has once again escaped. He flew into the woods last night. We located in in a tall tree in the woods and tried to talk him down until dark. We went back early this morning and he was no longer there. For some reason he was flew west, so he is headed directly into the neighborhood. The problem is that Duke’s wing feathers have just recently grown out from the last trim and he does not have skilled ability to fly down and land. If you see him, please let us know. Our numbers are: Marianne cellphone is 865-679-7999 Odgie cellphone is 865-660-3133 Home phone is 865-577-3133 Duke is a very friendly bird. Just hold out you hand vertically above his little feet and he will step right up onto your finger. Then, please take him inside and sit him on a stair rail, or the back of a chair if you don’t wish to hold him. We will come and pick him up immediately. Duke loves bananas, oranges, grapes, crackers, chips, peanuts, and most of all he loves a bite of cheese. If found he will be thirsty and he will sit on your finger and drink water or juice from a shot glass. Duke is gray with a bright red tail and a black big. He likes to say “Hello, pilgrim” and he loves to yell my name, “Hey, Marianne.” He talks in long sentences in a man’s voice, and if he starts talking you will discover that he is politically conservative and he may even ask for your vote. Duke is 7 years old and has the vocabulary of about a 3 year old child when he talks. This form will not all me to post a picture. Thanks again for your help. Marianne and Odgie Oliveira Sent from my iPad — This e-mail was sent from the publiccontact form on Lakemoor Hills (http://lakemoorhillshoa.org)

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory – Vol. 9, No. 2 – Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016

 

PDF Version: http://bit.ly/NeighborhoodAdvisory2016-01-12

 

  1. Eastport / Lee Williams to Honor Police, Fire Fighters
  2. 2.  ONK Names Spencer Interim President
  3. To Apply for Grant Funding, You Must Attend a Workshop
  4. Networking Luncheon Will Connect City Neighborhoods
  5. Consider Donating Door Prize for Neighborhood Luncheon
  6. MPC to Ponder Senior Living Facility in South Knoxville
  7. Meeting This Thursday: Future of Civic Auditorium and Coliseum
  8. Apply for Free Weatherization
  9. Magnolia Avenue Streetscape Designs to be Unveiled Next Week
  10. BZA Decisions Can Impact Your Neighborhood
  11. Bring Police Concerns to PARC Next Week
  12. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Published by the City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods to report news important to Knoxville’s residential neighborhoods. News & calendar deadline: 9 a.m. Tuesdays.

 

  1. Eastport / Lee Williams to Honor Police, Fire Fighters

 

“Who has never needed to call 911?”

 

Sylvia Cook, president to Eastport / Lee Williams Neighborhood Watch, posed this question to the members of her organization one day last year. When no hands were raised, she proceeded with, “And, didn’t they always come?” Everyone nodded.

 

“They never say, ‘Oh, so-and-so lives at that address so we just won’t go’, she continued. There was more nodding. “So don’t you think it is a good idea to show the folks who take care of us that we appreciate them?” All were in agreement. This started a tradition of honoring the police and fire fighters who serve the Eastport / Lee Williams community in East Knoxville.

 

Eastport / Lee Williams will devote its January meeting to celebrate the Knoxville police and fire departments. The group will meet at the Lee Williams Community Center at 12:00 noon on Wednesday, January 20. Homemade chili and cider will be served. All available emergency personnel are invited to attend.

 

For more, contact Sylvia Cook at sylviacook5901@comcast.net or 206-3433.

 

  1. ONK Names Spencer Interim President

 

Old North Knoxville, Inc. has selected Donna Spencer to serve as interim president, succeeding the late Andie Ray, who passed away in December. Elections for new officers will be held later this quarter.

 

  1. To Apply for Grant Funding, You Must Attend a Workshop

 

City neighborhood organizations that wish to apply for funding under the Neighborhood Small Grants Program must send a representative to either one of two mandatory pre-application workshops scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Thursday, January 14, and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 20, at the Cansler Family YMCA, 616 Jessamine Street.

 

Applications are due March 14, and awards will be announced in May for projects starting in July. The City is allocating up to $43,000 for the grants program this year.

 

Neighborhood groups can apply for grants ranging from $500 to $3,000. To enhance the impact of the city’s funding, grants must be matched with donations of goods and services, volunteer labor and other financial support for the project.

 

The grant guidelines and the application form are available on the city’s website.

Please note that many questions can be answered by reading the guidelines and looking over the application. Both the guidelines and application will be reviewed at the workshops.

 

Grant funds can be used for projects and programs developed by resident-led, resident-controlled neighborhood associations, tenant associations, homeowners associations, and neighborhood watch groups that serve neighborhoods inside city limits. Start-up neighborhood groups may also apply.

 

Questions? Call David Massey at 215-3232.

 

  1. Networking Luncheon Will Connect City Neighborhoods

 

In the cold of winter, those who loyally attend neighborhood meetings and invest their time in neighborhood improvement might understandably feel isolated and few in number.

 

In fact, hundreds of Knoxville citizens work tirelessly to strengthen their neighborhoods, either through their neighborhood organizations or in individual acts of neighborliness.

 

And all of them — all of you — will have a chance to meet and learn from one another at the City of Knoxville Neighborhood Awards and Networking Luncheon, which will be held Saturday, March 5, at the Knoxville Convention Center.

 

This is a heads up. Mark your calendars now. Registration will begin soon.

 

Doors will open at 10 a.m. for coffee and informal conversation with Mayor Madeline Rogero, city department heads, and neighborhood leaders from across the city. Information booths will offer a wealth of information on city services. A special program — more about this later — will take place from 11 a.m. until noon, followed by the awards luncheon.

 

Mayor Rogero will present the Diana Conn Good Neighbor of the Year Award and Neighborhood Achievement Awards. Nominations for the Good Neighbor award have now closed, but neighborhood organizations can still apply for an achievement award. (See this page or call David Massey at 215-3232.)

 

The event will close with drawings for door prizes beginning at 1:30 p.m. The “quirky” and popular local music group, the Old City Buskers, will provide the entertainment for the entire event.

 

This event will be useful to anyone interested in the health and vitality of Knoxville’s residential neighborhoods, especially members and leaders of Knoxville’s 120-plus neighborhood groups. The event will feature opportunities for sharing ideas and making cross-neighborhood connections.

 

  1. Consider Donating Door Prize for Neighborhood Luncheon

 

Neighborhood organizations, businesses and nonprofits are urged to consider donating a door prize for the 2016 Neighborhood Awards and Networking Luncheon on March 5 at the Knoxville Convention Center.

 

Donors will be recognized in this newsletter, on the Office of Neighborhoods website and at the luncheon itself.

 

Donations are needed by Friday, Feb. 12, but a commitment sooner would be greatly appreciated. Contact Rebecca McIver atrmciver@knoxvilletn.gov or 215-3456.

 

The following local businesses have already donated or committed to donating a prize for the luncheon: Bailey Fiber Art Studio, Billy Lush Board Shop, Bluetique, Bula, Central Flats & Taps, Happy Envelope, Good Golly Tamale, Knox Whisky Works, Lox Old City Salon, Pioneer House, SugarBuzz, Sweet P’s BBQ, Tennessee Theater and Visit Knoxville.

 

So far, the donated door prizes include gift certificates, gift baskets, printed posters, private tours, and even jewelry and Parisian macarons.

 

  1. MPC to Ponder Senior Living Facility in South Knoxville

 

The Metropolitan Planning Commission — meeting at 1:30 p.m. this Thursday, Jan. 14 — will consider whether to grant a use-on-review to transform the vacant and deteriorating Giffin School building, 1834 Beech Street, into a senior living facility.

 

Proposed by Giffin Senior Community Partners LLC, the facility would include nine independent living units, 50 assisted living units, adult day care and a clinic. The use-on-review would be subject to nine conditions. For details, see the MPC agenda at http://agenda.knoxmpc.org/agenda.pdf and click on agenda item 43.

 

Meanwhile, MPC staff is recommending that a proposal for a mixed use zone in the Bearden area be postponed until the March meeting “to ensure adequate time for public review and input.”

 

Other city items are on the January agenda. Neighborhood organizations are urged to keep up with the MPC agenda to watch out for rezonings and other changes that might impact their neighborhoods. To receive MPC notifications by email, visit www.knoxmpc.org and click on the email icon at the bottom of the home page.

 

  1. Meeting This Thursday: Future of Civic Auditorium and Coliseum

 

The City of Knoxville will hold a public meeting at the Civic Auditorium, 500 Howard Baker Jr. Ave., at 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 14, to discuss the recently completed feasibility study for the Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum (KCAC). Free parking will be provided in the Coliseum garage.

 

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero and City staff will be joined by representatives of the consulting firm Conventions, Sports and Leisure International. The consultant’s study — which is available on the City’s website at www.knoxvilletn.gov/kcacstudy — outlines three options and presents the pros and cons of each option. These are:

 

1) Retain existing KCAC with minimum upgrades – basically a “status quo maintenance.”

 

2) Major Renovation / redevelopment of KCAC (make major upgrades to the auditorium and build a new coliseum at that site)

 

3) Full Replacement (tear all down and build new — either at that site or elsewhere).

 

Cost estimates for various options within those alternatives range from $26 million to $279.5 million. The study also estimates the direct and indirect economic benefits of each of the scenarios.

 

“We look forward to a good discussion,” Mayor Rogero wrote in a recent email. “No decision has been made at this point, and it is important that the community hears the options, the costs, and the opportunities, and then shares their feedback with us.”

 

KCAC opened in 1961 and consists of the 6,540-seat Coliseum (4,790 seats for hockey or ice shows), the 2,500-seat Auditorium, a 4,800-square foot ballroom, 10,000 square feet of exhibit space and an outdoor plaza with a capacity of 10,000. There are 2,500 parking spaces among three connected/adjacent garages.

 

For anyone unable to attend the public meeting, comments can be submitted via email to comments@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

  1. Apply for Free Weatherization

 

If you have not yet applied to the Knoxville Extreme Energy Makeover weatherization program (KEEM) yet, now is your chance.

 

KEEM will be holding special after-hours application sessions on Saturday, Jan. 16, and Saturday, Jan. 23, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at CAC’s Housing and Energy Office, 2247 Western Ave. Before attending, visit www.KEEMteam.com to view program eligibility information or call the CAC at 244-3080.

 

KEEM is a two-year, TVA-funded program that will provide energy efficiency and weatherization retrofits to over 1,200 low- and moderate-income homes in Knoxville. Eligible homes will receive upgrades that increase in-home comfort and reduce electricity consumption by an estimated 25 percent.

 

The KEEM Team is led by the Knoxville-Knox County CAC in partnership with the City of Knoxville, Knoxville Utilities Board, and the Alliance to Save Energy. KEEM supports the Smarter Cities Partnership, a coalition of more than 20 community organizations seeking to improve the quality, comfort, and affordability of Knoxville homes through energy efficiency.

 

  1. Magnolia Avenue Streetscape Designs to be Unveiled Next Week

 

The City of Knoxville will present the design details for Magnolia Avenue streetscape improvements at a public meeting on Thursday, Jan. 21, from 5:30-7 p.m. at the John T. O’Connor Senior Center, 611 Winona St.

 

Staff from the city’s Office of Redevelopment and Engineering Department, along with design consultants from Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon, will present final designs for streetscape improvements to a six-block section of Magnolia Avenue between Jessamine Street and North Bertrand Street. Public comment will follow.

 

Proposed improvements include raised medians to replace the center left-turn lane; bike lanes; improved sidewalks; bus pull-offs; and streetscape amenities that include street lighting, benches and bike racks. Traffic signals will be upgraded, and pedestrian signals and crosswalks will be improved. Left-turn lanes will be provided at major intersections.

 

In addition, there will be a two-week public comment period following the Jan. 21 meeting. After Thursday, the proposed design can be viewed on the city website at  http://www.knoxvilletn.gov/Redevelopment or in person at the Redevelopment office, Room 655, City County Building, 400 Main Street, from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Comment cards will be available.

 

Ideas and comments also can be sent to Redevelopment Director Dawn Michelle Foster at dmfoster@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

  1. BZA Decisions Can Impact Your Neighborhood

 

Fifteen properties are on the agenda for next week’s meeting of the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA).

 

Established by city ordinance, BZA hears appeals of denials of building permits by the city’s Building Inspections Department. The board, consisting of five citizens appointed by the Mayor, meets at 4 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month in the Small Assembly Room of the City County Building.

 

BZA meets next Thursday, January 21. Addresses on the agenda include 2701 Spence Place, 322 Barrar Avenue, 2308 Forest Avenue, 1612 Elm Street, 2613 Adair Drive, 1132 N. Sixth Avenue, 220 Carrick Street, 2714 Chapman Highway, 205 W. Depot Avenue, 310 Ogden Street, 203 N. Seven Oaks Drive, 300 E. Depot Avenue, 4315 Kingston Pike, 151 E. Blount Avenue, and 708 Morgan Street.

 

Keep up with how the BZA might impact your neighborhood. Watch for the black and white signs indicating that there is a pending decision on a particular piece of property. Most signs are for Metropolitan Planning Commission issues — which are also important — but signs with the word “variance” are BZA items.

 

The BZA agenda is posted on the city website. Browse to www.knoxvilletn.gov/boards and click on Board of Zoning Appeals. The agenda contains more detail on each variance request.

 

A neighborhood group that keeps track of BZA will call the Plans Review & Inspections Department at 215-3669 to request and study the paperwork on a particular appeal, decide whether to take a position on the appeal, and then attend the BZA meeting to voice the group’s support or objections. A group can also request a postponement to allow time to meet with the applicant.

 

Decisions of the BZA can be appealed within 15 days of the BZA decision to Knoxville City Council. Appeals of a City Council decision are made to Chancery Court within 60 days of a City Council decision related to BZA.

  1. Bring Police Concerns to PARC Next Week

 

The Police Advisory and Review Committee (PARC) is a civilian oversight committee that audits the discipline process and the policies and procedures of the Knoxville Police Department (KPD).

 

The purpose is to strengthen the relationship between the citizens of the City of Knoxville and the KPD; to assure timely, fair and objective review of citizen complaints while protecting the individual rights of police officers; and to make recommendations concerning citizen complaints to the Chief of Police and to the Mayor.

 

By making sure citizen concerns are addressed by an independent body, PARC aims to improve the relationship between members of KPD and the citizens they serve.

 

PARC meets quarterly, and its next meeting is at 6 p.m. Thursday, January 21, at New Friendship Baptist Church, 1933 Texas Avenue in Lonsdale. For more, contact Lisa Chambers at 215-3966 or visit http://www.cityofknoxville.org/boards/parc.

 

  1. 12.  Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Include your neighborhood-related event or meeting in this space. Call 215-4382.

 

Visit http://knoxvilletn.gov/calendar for a complete list of meetings of various city boards and commissions.

 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to attend a City of Knoxville public meeting, please contact Stephanie Brewer Cook at scook@knoxvilletn.gov or 215-2034 no less than 72 hours prior to the meeting you wish to attend. For an English interpreter, contact David Massey at 215-3232 or dmassey@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

Tuesday, January 12 through Monday, January 18

King Week 2016

Martin Luther King Commemorative Commission

http://www.mlkknoxville.com/2016-events/

 

Tuesday, January 12 — 5 p.m.

Public Forum

Proposed Plans Review and Permit Fees Increase

Small Assembly Room, CCB

215-2999

 

Tuesday, January 12 — 5:30 p.m.

Public Meeting

City of Knoxville Community Development Department

Annual Action Plan Update for Use of Federal Funds in 2016-2017

O’Connor Senior Center, 611 Winona Street

Linda Rust, lrust@knoxvilletn.gov, 215-2120

 

Tuesday, January 12 — 6 p.m.

Brown Avenue Neighborhood Watch (Second Tuesdays)

Hoitt Ave. Baptist Church, 2121 Hoitt Ave.

Jimmy Ramsey, 637-0243

 

Wednesday, January 1310-11:30 a.m.

Food Policy Council

(Second Wednesdays but check website for confirmation)

Knox County Health Department, 140 Dameron Avenue

http://www.knoxfood.org; info@knoxfood.org

 

Wednesday, January 13 — 11:30 a.m.

Community Forum (Second Wednesdays)

Bearden Branch Library, 100 Golf Club Road

Sue Mauer, 690-0269

 

Wednesday, January 134:30 p.m.

Neighborhood Advisory Council, City of Knoxville

(Second Wednesdays except December)

Cansler YMCA, 616 Jessamine St.

http://www.knoxvilletn.gov/neighborhoods

David Massey, 215-3232

 

Thursday, January 14 — 1:30 p.m.

Metropolitan Planning Commission (Second Thursdays)

Large Assembly Room, City County Building

http://www.knoxmpc.org

Agenda: http://agenda.knoxmpc.org

 

Thursday, January 145:30 p.m.

Grants Workshop (first of two identical workshops)

Neighborhood Small Grants Program

Office of Neighborhoods

Cansler YMCA, 616 Jessamine Street

Debbie Sharp, 215-5382, or David Massey, 215-3232

 

Thursday, January 14 — 6 p.m.

Lonsdale Homes Resident Association (Second Thursdays)

Community Building, 1956 Goins Dr.

Phyllis Patrick, 323-7224

 

Thursday, January 14 — 6 p.m.

Public Meeting: Future of Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum

Presentation on Study Results and Public Discussion

Civic Auditorium, 500 Howard Baker Jr. Ave. (Free parking)

www.knoxvilletn.gov/kcacstudy

 

Thursday, January 146:30 p.m.

“Savings in the House” Workshop

Tips on how to reduce your KUB bill

Knoxville Area Transit Center, 301 E. Church Ave.

244-3080 or www.KEEMTeam.com

 

Saturday, January 169 a.m.-1 p.m.

Apply for Energy Efficiency Upgrades to Your Home

CAC Housing and Energy, 2247 Western Avenue

Check your eligibility at 244-3080 or www.KEEMteam.com

 

Saturday, January 16 — 10 a.m.

South Haven Neighborhood Association (Third Saturdays)

Hillcrest United Methodist Church, 1615 Price Ave.

Linda Rust, 679-9924, rstyldy1965@yahoo.com

 

Monday, January 18

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday

City Offices Closed

 

Monday, January 1810 a.m. and 11:45 a.m.

MLK Parade and Tribute Service

Parade starts at 10 a.m. from YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center, 124 S. Cruze Street and runs to Greater Warner Tabernacle Church, 3800 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, for the Tribute Service

Martin Luther King Commemorative Commission, admin@MLKKnoxville.com.

 

Monday, January 187 p.m.

Alice Bell Spring Hill Neighborhood Association

(Third Mondays except June, July, December)

All are welcome to attend.

New Harvest Park, 4775 New Harvest Lane

Ronnie Collins, 637-9630

 

Tuesday, January 195 p.m.

Knox Country Board of Education— Mid-month Work Session

(Usually held on the Monday before the regular meeting and

third Mondays, except holidays or holiday weeks.)

First Floor Board Room, Andrew Johnson Building, 912 South Gay St.

For agenda, work sessions, and other items:

Visit http://knoxschools.org. Click on “Board of Education.”

 

Tuesday, January 196 p.m.

Delrose Drive Neighborhood Watch

(Third Tuesdays in January, March, May, July, September and November)

Riverview Baptist Church, 3618 Delrose Dr.
Corina and John Buffalow, 523-0102

 

Tuesday, January 19 — 7 p.m.

Edgewood Park Neighborhood Association (Third Tuesdays, except December)

Larry Cox Senior Center, 3109 Ocoee Trail

Peter Pallesen, 200-8311, http://edgewoodpark.us/

 

Tuesday, January 197 p.m.

City Council (every other Tuesday)

Main Assembly Room, City County Building

http://www.knoxvilletn.gov/citycouncil

Agenda: http://knoxvillecitytn.iqm2.com

 

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory – Vol. 8, No. 44 – Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2015

 

PDF Version: http://bit.ly/NeighborhoodAdvisory2015-12-29

 

  1. Good Neighbor Nominations Are Due Monday
  2. Andie Ray: Neighborhood Leader, City Light
  3. Zaevion Dobson: Greater Love Hath No Man
  4. City Offices Closed Friday; Garbage and Recyclables Will be Collected
  5. Two Blocks of Cumberland Avenue Closed for Electric Work
  6. Citizens Invited to Annual Legislative Breakfast
  7. Grants Enable Botanical Garden to Proceed with Food Center
  8. Need Funding? Art Exposure? Alliance Seeks Ideas for Micro-Funding Event
  9. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Published by the City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods to report news important to Knoxville’s residential neighborhoods. News & calendar deadline: 9 a.m. Tuesdays.

 

  1. Good Neighbor Nominations Are Due Monday

 

Nominations for the Diana Conn Good Neighbor of the Year Award are due no later than Monday, January 4.

 

The award is presented annually to a City of Knoxville resident who — in a spirit of cooperation and with commitment to inclusive community — has devoted time and talent in service to his or her neighbors and neighborhood.

 

The winner and other finalists will be announced at the 2016 Neighborhood Awards and Networking Luncheon on Saturday, March 5, 2016, at the Knoxville Convention Center.

 

To learn more, visit www.knoxvilletn.gov/neighborhoods and click on Good Neighbor of the Year Award. Or just download the form. The form is easy to fill out. Just use your own words to describe the person you wish to honor.

 

Nominations can be sent to Debbie Sharp by email to dsharp@knoxvilletn.gov or by mail to Office of Neighborhoods – Room 528, City of Knoxville, P.O. Box 1631, Knoxville, TN 37901. Or call Debbie at 215-4382 to receive a hard copy of the form in the mail.

 

  1. Andie Ray: Neighborhood Leader, City Light

 

Good neighbors give their time and talent to community improvement, and this week Knoxville is remembering the many contributions of Andie Ray, who died Dec. 18 after a brief illness.

 

As others have noted, Andie was active in every neighborhood she lived in — from Maplehurst and Market Square to Old North Knoxville. As Jack Neely points out in last week’s Knoxville Mercury, she first lived on Market Square and then opened her women’s clothing store, Vagabodia, on the square in 2004. A tireless advocate for downtown renovation, she was active in Knox Heritage, City People, and the Market Square District Association.

 

Later she and her husband Noel Hudson moved to Old North. At the time of her passing she was president of the neighborhood association, Old North Knoxville. She was an ONK representative to the Broadway Corridor Task Force and a member of the Historic Zoning Commission.

 

“Andie really liked to connect with her community and her neighbors,” recalled Lauren Rider, her friend and colleague in Old North. “She adopted the neighborhoods she was in. There is barely a neighbor who walked past her house who did not know who she was. She made a point of talking to everybody, including everybody, and sharing her enthusiasm for the community.”

 

She will be missed.

 

  1. Zaevion Dobson: Greater Love Hath No Man

 

Our city this month is also mourning the death and celebrating the life and selfless sacrifice of Zaevion Dobson, the 15-year-old Fulton High School student who was shot and killed Dec. 17 shielding others from a spray of bullets fired by as-yet-unnamed assailants onto a porch in the Lonsdale community.

 

Zaevion was a member of Martin Chapel United Methodist Church and a sophomore at Fulton High School, where he played linebacker on the football team. He was well regarded by teammates and classmates, many of whom who wore his jersey number, 24, at his funeral services last weekend.

 

But Zaevion was much more than a young man enthralled with football, according to André Canty who, as a member of 100 Black Men of Knoxville, mentored the young student. “Being an athlete was only a part of his being,” Canty said. “He was always there. He was involved (in efforts) to stop the violence.”

 

Zaevion was part of what Canty calls the “Save Our Sons Brain Trust,” a group of young people who helped plan and identify the discussion topics for the “Son’s Summit” last June which in turn was part of a local “Save Our Sons” initiative to address violence among African American men and boys.

 

Moreover, having benefitted from the mentoring provided by Canty and 100 Black Men, Zaevion was himself helping youth at Emerald Youth Foundation programs in which he participated. “He did not wait until he was an adult,” Canty said. “He said, ‘I’m not going to wait. I’ve learned some lessons I can tell other kids.’ That’s powerful. That’s commendable. He took time out to mentor other kids.”

 

He was doing all of that while he was attending football practice,” Canty noted. “He was already involved in the community. He was around others who tried to show him the way. He learned lessons from his Mom, us, his coaches. He built up a sense of selflessness in himself.”

 

What Zaevion did on the night of December 17 “wasn’t just a quick reaction but a manifestation of all the lessons he had learned. If you see someone in need, you be there for that person. He went the extra mile and sacrificed his life.”

 

Canty, who is now president of 100 Black Men, notes that 23-year-old Brandon Perry also lost his life on Dec. 17, and his funeral was held on the same day as Zaevion’s service.

 

Because it is believed that Perry was involved in the retaliatory gang violence that took Zaevion’s life, “people may have demonized him,” Canty said. “Even if he did it, there is a culture of violence that made him the way he was. In a sense, that makes him a victim, too. I am not apologizing for what he did, but there is a family grieving on his side, too.”

 

Canty said the community’s effort to stop violence focuses, in part, on youth who have already lost their way, who have reacted negatively to pain and trauma, who have been bred for war as if they live in a third world country. “No child should be bred for war,” he lamented.

 

Canty and many others in the African American community in Knoxville have lost loved ones or friends or acquaintances to this violence. But Zaevion “did everything right and he was still taken away,” sharpening the grief, Canty said.

 

Zaevion’s courage and character have been praised all the way from Lonsdale to the White House. “Zaevion Dobson died saving three friends from getting shot,” President Obama tweeted two days after the shooting. “He was a hero at 15. What’s our excuse for not acting?”

 

See www.knoxvilletn.gov/saveoursons for more on the City’s Save Our Sons initiative.

 

Meanwhile, Overcoming Believers Church, 211 Harriet Tubman Street, will host a community meeting at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 30, “to develop strategies for saving our youth.”

 

  1. City Offices Closed Friday; Garbage and Recyclables Will be Collected

 

City of Knoxville offices will be closed Friday, Jan. 1, but the city’s garbage and recycling contractor, Waste Connections, will run its regular trash and recycling routes this week, so pickups of trash and recyclables WILL occur on Friday despite the holiday.

 

Downtown trash and recycling will also run on the regular schedule on Friday. The city’s recycling centers will be open for recycling use, but the Goodwill attendant will not be available for household goods donations on Friday. The city’s Solid Waste Management Facility, 1033 Elm Street, will be closed both Friday and Saturday.

 

  1. Two Blocks of Cumberland Avenue Closed for Electric Work

 

Two blocks of Cumberland Avenue between 17th and 19th streets will be closed to through traffic beginning Tuesday, Dec. 29, until Tuesday, Jan. 5, to allow for the installation of an underground electrical line.

 

Local traffic and pedestrian access to businesses along Cumberland Avenue will be maintained.

 

The electrical line will carry power from a Knoxville Utilities Board substation at Dale Avenue to the Cumberland Avenue area and beyond. It will allow the removal of overhead power lines along Cumberland Avenue, part of the City’s overall $17 million reconstruction of the corridor.

 

The Cumberland Avenue project, scheduled to be completed in August 2017, will change the existing four-lane street on the eastern end of the corridor to a three-lane cross section with a raised median and left-turn lanes at intersections between 22nd Street and 17th Street.

 

Phase I work on the western end of Cumberland, between the Alcoa Highway ramps and 22nd Street, is coming to an end — on time and on budget. Phase II is underway.

 

More information about the project is available at www.CumberlandConnect.com , from which you can access the Cumberland Connect Facebook page and the Cumberland Connect phone app.

 

  1. Citizens Invited to Annual Legislative Breakfast

 

The League of Women Voters of Knoxville/Knox County (LWVKKC) is inviting Knox County citizens to participate in its annual Legislative Breakfast from 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 9, at the Knox Room of the Knoxville News Sentinel building, 2332 News Sentinel Drive. A continental breakfast will be served.

 

State Senators Richard Briggs, Becky Massey and Randy McNally have been invited to participate in a question and answer session regarding legislation of the 109th Tennessee General Assembly, which convenes the following week.

 

Key legislation includes the reallocation of surplus revenues and the regulation of marijuana and handgun permits. Other likely topics are healthcare and the proposed outsourcing of management of state facilities.

 

The News Sentinel is co-sponsoring the event. The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

 

  1. Grants Enable Botanical Garden to Proceed with Food Center

 

Knoxville Botanical Garden and Arboretum (KBGA), 2743 Wimpole Avenue, has now received all of the funding necessary to proceed with the $370,000 conversion of an existing structure, known as the Mule Barn, to an indoor food market, community meeting space and education kitchen.

 

Construction likely will begin by early spring, according to Robert Hodge, who heads KBGA’s Center for Urban Agriculture. “This initiative will be a model for permaculture and sustainable living practices that will provide both economic and ecological benefits to our city and its residents,” Hodge said recently.

 

Mayor Madeline Rogero and City Council allocated $250,000 for this facility in the City of Knoxville’s FY 2015 budget. This investment leveraged two more recent donations — $50,000 from the Siddiqi Charitable Foundation and another $70,000 from the Tennessee Department of Agriculture.

 

The Center is already leasing plots of land for family and market gardens. Since food is grown on site, gardeners will be able to sell their produce locally at the new facility. Area farmers can also use the facility to sell their goods. Hodge noted that the 47-acre KGBA site is located in East Knoxville, where access to fresh, healthy and affordable foods is limited.

 

When not used for produce sales, the space can be leased by art and theatre groups, along with other cultural activities, for special events, Hodge added.

 

The kitchen “will be used by our gardeners and also will be rented out to entrepreneurs,” Hodge explained. “We are excited about the job creation that comes from having a rentable commercial kitchen available to people wanting to make money through food. This will be a jobs and business incubator.”

 

Finally, the kitchen will host culinary and canning classes. Hodge noted that the Center is already in discussion with community-based organizations that are working to improve access to and knowledge of healthy foods.

 

These groups include Nourish Knoxville, publisher of a local food guide and organizer of the Market Square Farmers’ Market; Slow Food Tennessee Valley, which stages the annual Pesto Festo; and the Knoxville Chapter of National Women in Agriculture, which addresses needs of women without access to healthy food.

 

Hodge projects that the space for the produce market will be open by late spring, and the kitchen will be ready by late summer. While there is a small waiting list for the 4×12 family garden plots, an even larger plot is available for someone who wishes to market the produce. For more, contact Hodge at farmingurbanknoxville@gmail.com  or 591-8677.

 

  1. Need Funding? Art Exposure? Alliance Seeks Ideas for Micro-Funding Event

 

The South Knoxville Alliance is now accepting proposals for community projects and featured artists for its next Knoxville SOUP dinner, which will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, January 7, at Vestal United Methodist Church, 115 Ogle Ave., with a suggested donation of $5 per person.

 

Proposal deadline has been extended to Sunday, January 3, 2016.

 

Knoxville SOUP is a dinner and micro-funding event designed to raise money for creative projects and to give exposure to local artists who display their art.

 

Project Proposals and Featured Artist Proposals are accepted from all over Knoxville, not just South Knoxville. Click here to apply for your project ideas. Click here to apply for the next featured artist slot.

 

“The exposure for the projects goes beyond the dinner,” said Debra Bradshaw, chair of the South Knoxville Alliance, which brought SOUP dinners to Knoxville. “One of the projects presented at our last dinner was funded in full by a private donation. The project funding need would not have been known if it had not been for the great press Knoxville SOUP received.” The last event dinner raised over $500 for the Joe Hill Roadshow.

Knoxville SOUP events are held quarterly. Proposal deadlines are always one week prior to the dinner.  The next few proposal due dates are March 31, June 30, and October 29, all in 2016.  See www.KnoxvilleSOUP.org for more information.

South Knoxville Alliance is a group of businesses and community leaders who promote growth and improvement in the South Knoxville area.

 

  1. 9.  Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Include your neighborhood-related event or meeting in this space. Call 215-4382.

 

Visit http://knoxvilletn.gov/calendar for a complete list of meetings of various city boards and commissions.

 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to attend a City of Knoxville public meeting, please contact Stephanie Brewer Cook at scook@knoxvilletn.gov or 215-2034 no less than 72 hours prior to the meeting you wish to attend. For an English interpreter, contact Joshalyn Hundley, Title VI Coordinator, at 865.215.3867 or atjhundley@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

Wednesday, December 306 p.m.

Heal the Land Knoxville

“Community gathering to develop strategies for saving our youth”

Overcoming Believers Church, 211 Harriett Tubman Street

 

Monday, January 41 p.m.

East Knoxville Community Meeting (First Mondays)

Burlington Branch Library, 4614 Asheville Highway

Michael Covington, 274-7958, mdcov@hotmail.com

 

Monday, January 44 p.m.

Love Towers Fellowship Association (First Mondays except holidays)

Love Towers Community Room; 1171 Armstrong St.

Bill Jackson, 221-4402

 

Monday, January 4 — 5 p.m.

Knox Country Board of Education—Work Session

(Usually held on the Monday before the regular meeting and

third Mondays, except holidays or holiday weeks.)

First Floor Board Room, Andrew Johnson Building, 912 South Gay St.

For agenda, work sessions, and other items:

Visit http://knoxschools.org. Click on “Board of Education.”

 

Monday, January 46:30 p.m.

Parkridge Community Organization (First Mondays except holidays)

Cansler YMCA, 616 Jessamine St.

David Anderson, (803) 259-6289, dander19@utk.edu

 

Monday, January 47 p.m.

Oakwood Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association (First Mondays)

Community Club House, 916 Shamrock Ave. at Henegar St.

Bill Hutton, 773-5228, s_wlhutton@yahoo.com

 

Monday, January 4

Deadline for Nominations

Diana Conn Good Neighbor of the Year Award

Office of Neighborhoods, www.knoxvilletn.gov/neighborhoods

Debbie Sharp, 215-4382

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory – Vol. 8, No. 42 – Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015

 

PDF Version: http://bit.ly/NeighborhoodAdvisory2015-12-08

 

  1. Community Meeting Tomorrow to Address Youth Concerns
  2. Parkridge Votes to Request Expansion of Historic Overlay
  3. City Seeks Nominations for Neighborhood Achievement Awards
  4. Participants Sought for City’s 225th Anniversary Celebration
  5. BZA Decisions Can Impact Your Neighborhood
  6. KKB Revamps Orchid Categories, Seeks Nominations
  7. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Published by the City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods to report news important to Knoxville’s residential neighborhoods. News & calendar deadline: 5 p.m. Mondays.

 

  1. Community Meeting Tomorrow to Address Youth Concerns

 

Three Knoxville citizens are asking residents and friends of East Knoxville, Mechanicsville, Lonsdale, Beaumont and Western Heights to attend a “Saving Our Community” meetingtomorrow night, Wednesday, Dec. 9, to address concerns about young people in the community.

 

The meeting will run from 7-9 p.m. at Vine Middle Magnet School, 1807 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue.

 

The three organizers are Rev. Sanford Miller, pastor of New Salem Baptist Church; Maurice Clark, a coach of community youth sports teams; and Rick Staples, chair of the mentorship committee of One Hundred Black Men of Knoxville. Clark is also founder of One Nation by Conviction, a social justice organization that advocates against the disparity in drug sentencing laws.

 

Miller, Clark and Staples are seeking ideas and inspiration for working more effectively with young people who, despite efforts by community members, are still turning to violence and crime. Recent suicides and attempted suicides by young people have prompted this meeting, Staples said.

 

“This burdens my heart,” Staples said. “Where is the disconnect? We need to figure out what’s going on among young people and how to reach them. This is a concern for the community as a whole.”

 

  1. Parkridge Votes to Request Expansion of Historic Overlay

 

At its regular monthly meeting on Dec. 7, the Parkridge Community Organization (PCO) decided to move forward with the proposed expansion of the H1 overlay district in the neighborhood.

 

PCO members voted 17-7 to request, via letter, that Sixth District City Councilman and former Mayor Dan Brown “sponsor with the City Council the PCO’s effort to proceed with the public process for the H1 overlay extension in the Parkridge area.”

 

PCO is seeking the normal protocol for general rezonings. This starts with a resolution from City Council asking the Metropolitan Planning Commission to study and make recommendation on the proposed rezoning. A favorable recommendation from MPC would go back to City Council in the form of an ordinance requiring two readings and votes.

 

For historic overlay requests, the Historic Zoning Commission also is asked to review the proposal and make a recommendation to City Council.

 

As proposed by PCO, the new H1 area would be bounded by Glenwood Avenue from Winona Street to Olive Street, Washington Avenue to Chestnut Street, Jefferson Avenue to Cherry Street, and Woodbine Avenue to Cherry Street.

 

This would be the first major expansion of an H1 Overlay District since such districts were established in Old Mechanicsville (1991), Old North Knoxville (1992), Parkridge (Edgewood-Park City, 1997), Fourth & Gill (1999) and Market Square (2001).

 

See https://parkridgecommunity.wordpress.com/preservation/planning/ for more detail on the Parkridge proposal, which has been debated in earnest for over the past year.

 

To view the current H1 zone in Parkridge, visit http://www.kgis.org/kgismaps/map.htm , zoom in on Parkridge, and select “Maps” and “zoning” in the left hand navigation column.

3.  City Seeks Nominations for Neighborhood Achievement Awards

 

The City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods is now accepting applications for Neighborhood Achievement Awards.

 

These awards will be presented at the Neighborhood Awards & Networking Luncheon to be held at the Knoxville Convention Center on Saturday, March 5, 2016.

 

Neighborhood groups are encouraged to apply, and it is also possible for an individual or another organization to nominate a neighborhood group. The deadline for submitting an application/nomination is Monday, January 11, 2016. Download the application/nomination form. Or call Debbie Sharp at 215-4382 to have a hard copy mailed to you.

 

Any resident-led, resident-controlled city neighborhood group recognized by the Office of Neighborhoods is eligible to apply or be nominated for this award. This includes neighborhood associations, homeowners associations, neighborhood watch groups and tenant/renter associations.

 

Whether your group is large or small, well established or brand new, your group is encouraged to apply. The awards will showcase accomplishments by neighborhood groups during calendar year 2014 and 2015. Example accomplishments include:

 

— Beautification and place-making projects, green spaces and community gardens, and other physical improvements to the neighborhood;

 

— Projects, events and activities that focus on connecting neighbors with one another, such as street fairs, potlucks, home tours, holiday celebrations, and neighbors helping neighbors;

 

— New or ongoing communication efforts such as newsletters, social media and phone tree networks; and

 

— Activities involved in launching, reviving, or strengthening a neighborhood group.

 

Working with the Office of Neighborhoods, an awards committee will select winners from the pool of applications and nominations. The number and category of awards will be determined by the awards committee based on the applications.  The winners will be announced at the March 5, 2016 Neighborhood Awards & Networking Luncheon.

 

  1. Participants Sought for City’s 225th Anniversary Celebration

 

The City of Knoxville was founded on October 3, 1791, and preparations have begun for a 225thAnniversary Celebration next year.

 

Visit Knoxville, the convention and visitors bureau for Knoxville and Knox County, is seeking participants (including neighborhood organizations) to join the celebration.

 

Since the idea is to celebrate the city throughout its history, neighborhood organizations who wish to participate are limited only by their creativity in how they relate to the 225 theme. Ideas might range from a neighborhood history project (youth interviewing older residents) to the dedication of a time capsule to a special event to a service project.

 

Any neighborhood or neighborhood group can participate, not just “historic” neighborhoods. Interested groups have time to plan an activity that can become part of the celebration during the year and that can be added to a special 225 website at any point.

 

To explore ideas, contact Calvin Chappelle, heritage tourism coordinator for Visit Knoxville atcalvin@knoxville.org or 865-951-6614.

 

Among the elements now in the planning:

— There will be a 225 kick-off event on February 6, which is the 220th anniversary of the day that the Tennessee Constitution was signed.

 

— All local art and cultural organizations will be encouraged to highlight their activities under the 225th anniversary lens. The Arts and Culture Alliance and the East Tennessee Historical Society will also be major partners in programming.

 

— Jack Neely and the Knoxville History Project / Knoxville Mercury newspaper will create a “Top 25” most interesting and compelling historical facts about the city.

 

— Preexisting festivals such as Dogwood Arts will feature some aspect of 225.

 

June 1 is Tennessee Statehood Day, and the Historic Homes of Knoxville and the East Tennessee Historical Society will be offering programming.

 

— The grand finale will occur on the weekend leading up to Oct. 3, 2016, which is the actual 225th anniversary date. The Historic Homes of Knoxville will have their annual Founders Day Luncheon on that day.

 

  1. BZA Decisions Can Impact Your Neighborhood

 

Ten properties are on the agenda for next week’s meeting of the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA).

 

Established by city ordinance, BZA hears appeals of denials of building permits by the city’s Building Inspections Department. The board, consisting of five citizens appointed by the Mayor, meets at 4 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month in the Small Assembly Room of the City County Building.

 

BZA meets next Thursday, Dec. 17. Addresses on the agenda include 1421 Southgate Road in Sequoyah Hills, 6909 Quail Drive in Deane Hill, 2701 Spence Place (Island Home Airport), 226 N. Peters Road in West Knoxville, 5760 Grove Drive next to Fountain City Elementary School, 3447 Reagan Avenue in Marble City, 9956 Dutchtown Road in West Knoxville, 515 Wellsley Park Road and 7310-7350 Antoinette Way off Deane Hill Drive, 1995 Henley Street next to Henley Bridge south of the river, and 9546 S. Northshore Drive in West Knoxville.

 

Keep up with how the BZA might impact your neighborhood. Watch for the black and white signs indicating that there is a pending decision on a particular piece of property. Most signs are for Metropolitan Planning Commission issues — which are also important — but signs with the word “variance” are BZA items.

 

The BZA agenda is posted on the city website. Browse to www.knoxvilletn.gov/boards and click on Board of Zoning Appeals. The agenda is posted no later than the Monday prior to the BZA meeting each month.

 

A neighborhood group that keeps track of BZA will call the Plans Review & Inspections Department at 215-3669 to request and study the paperwork on a particular appeal, decide whether to take a position on the appeal, and then attend the BZA meeting to voice the group’s support or objections. A group can also request a postponement to allow time to meet with the applicant.

 

Decisions of the BZA can be appealed within 15 days of the BZA decision to Knoxville City Council. Appeals of a City Council decision are made to Chancery Court within 60 days of a City Council decision related to BZA.

  1. KKB Revamps Orchid Categories, Seeks Nominations

 

Keep Knoxville Beautiful (KKB) is now accepting nominations from the public for its beautification awards, the Orchids, that recognize exceptional work on buildings and outdoor spaces that beautify the local landscape in both the city and county.

 

Orchid Awards will be granted in the six categories: New Architecture, Redesign/Reuse, Restaurant/Cafe/Bar/Brewery, Environmental Stewardship, Outdoor Space, and Public Art.

 

“This year we revamped a few of the categories to reflect some of the changes happening in our dynamic city,” said Patience Melnik, KKB’s executive director. “We added the restaurant/brewery, environmental stewardship, and public art categories to celebrate these growing elements in our community.”

 

Anyone can nominate a location or outdoor public artwork by completing a simple online form on KKB’s website at www.keepknoxvillebeautiful.org, or by calling the office at 865-521-6957.

 

Each year, an independent panel of judges assesses the dozens of award nominations. Past panels have included architects, commercial builders, realtors, landscape architects, historic preservationists, community leaders, and owners of properties that have received Orchid Awards in the past.

 

Keep Knoxville Beautiful will announce the winners of the beautification awards at the annual Orchids Awards Dinner on Tuesday, March 1, 2016, at The Standard, 416 W. Jackson Avenue. Tickets can be purchased on the KKB website.

 

Private residences are not considered for this award. Properties can win only once except in cases of major renovations. Nominations are due by Friday, January 8, 2015.

 

  1. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Include your neighborhood-related event or meeting in this space. Call 215-4382.

 

Visit http://knoxvilletn.gov/calendar for a complete list of meetings of various city boards and commissions.

 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to attend a City of Knoxville public meeting, please contact Stephanie Brewer Cook at scook@knoxvilletn.gov or 215-2034 no lessthan 72 hours prior to the meeting you wish to attend. For an English interpreter, contact Joshalyn Hundley, Title VI Coordinator, at 865.215.3867 or at jhundley@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

Tuesday, December 8 — 4-5 p.m.

City of Knoxville Greenways Commission

(Second Tuesdays, even-numbered months)

Larry Cox Senior Center, 3109 Ocoee Trail

http://knoxvilletn.gov/government/boards_commissions/greenways_commission/

Lori Goerlich, Parks & Recreation Dept., 215-2807

 

Tuesday, December 8 — 6 p.m.

Brown Avenue Neighborhood Watch (Second Tuesdays)

Hoitt Ave. Baptist Church, 2121 Hoitt Ave.

Jimmy Ramsey, 637-0243

 

Tuesday, December 8 — 7 p.m.

City Council (Every Other Tuesday)

Main Assembly Room, City County Building

http://www.knoxvilletn.gov/citycouncil

Agenda: http://knoxvillecitytn.iqm2.com

 

Wednesday, December 9 — 10-11:30 a.m.

Food Policy Council

(Second Wednesdays but check website for confirmation)

Knox County Health Department, 140 Dameron Avenue

http://www.knoxfood.org; info@knoxfood.org

 

Wednesday, December 9 — 11:30 a.m.

Community Forum (Second Wednesdays)

Bearden Branch Library, 100 Golf Club Road

Sue Mauer, 690-0269

 

Thursday, December 10 — 1:30 p.m.

Metropolitan Planning Commission (Second Thursdays)

Large Assembly Room, City County Building

http://www.knoxmpc.org

Agenda: http://agenda.knoxmpc.org

 

Thursday, December 105:30 p.m.

Public Input Meeting

Review final design plans for Sevier Avenue Streetscapes Improvement Project

South Knoxville Elementary School, 801 Sevier Ave.

Dawn Michelle Foster, dmfoster@knoxvilletn.gov , 215-2607

 

Thursday, December 10 — 6 p.m.

Lonsdale Homes Resident Association (Second Thursdays)

Community Building, 1956 Goins Dr.

Phyllis Patrick, 323-7224

 

Friday, December 11 — 7:45 a.m. and 8 a.m.

North Knoxville Business & Professional Association (Second Fridays)

Breakfast at 7:45 am, Meeting at 8 a.m.

Open to North Knoxville Residents, Neighborhood Groups, Business Owners

Meeting location varies. Check Website for location. http://northknoxvillebpa.org/

Becky Dodson, becky.dodson@hma.com, 545-6750.

 

Friday, December 116 p.m.

Beaumont Community Organization (Second Fridays)

Community Room, Solid Waste Transfer Station, 1033 Elm St.

Natasha Murphy, 936-0139

 

Saturday, December 129 a.m. until last person is heard

“Coffee with the Councilman”

(Usually the Last Saturday of Each Quarter)

Vice Mayor and First District City Council Member Nick Pavlis

Bring your concerns or stop by to chat; open to all city residents.

Roundup Restaurant, 3643 Sevierville Pike

Nick Pavlis, 851-6671

 

Saturday, December 122-4 p.m.

Holiday Party

Burlington Residents Association

Burlington Branch Library, 4614 Asheville Highway

Kimberley Fowler, 524-7094, ccfp@comcast.net

 

Saturday, December 12 — 4:30-8 p.m.

Holiday Open House

Music, artwork, door prizes, refreshments

Candoro Arts and Heritage Center, 4450 Candora Dr.

Sharon Davis, 640-5700

 

Sunday, December 132 p.m.

Historic Sutherland Heights Neighborhood Association

(Second Sundays, even-numbered months)

Marble City Baptist Church, 2740 Sutherland Avenue

John Yates, 588-8883, john.a.yates1950@gmail.com

 

Monday, December 1411:30 a.m.

Central Business Improvement District (CBID) Board Meeting

Knoxville Chamber, 17 Market Square

http://www.downtownknoxville.org/

Michele Hummel, 246-2654, mhummel@downtownknoxville.org

 

Monday, December 141:30 p.m.

Montgomery Village Residents Association (Second Mondays)

4600 Joe Lewis Rd. #175

Ronnie Thompson, 583-9221

 

Monday, December 14 — 3 p.m.

Northgate Resident Association (Second Mondays)

Social Hall, 4301 Whittle Springs Rd.

David Wildsmith, 219-0417

 

Monday, December 14 — 5-6 p.m.

Cold Springs Neighborhood Watch (Second Mondays)

Michael Meadowview Neighborhood Watch (Second Mondays)

CAC East Neighborhood Center, 4200 Asheville Hwy.

Michael Meadowview:  Marian Bailey, 525-5625

Cold Springs: Terrell Patrick, 525-4833

 

Monday, December 14 — 6 p.m.

Lyons View Community Club (Second Mondays)

Lyons View Community Center, 114 Sprankle Ave.

Mary Brewster, 454-2390

 

Monday, December 14 — 6 p.m.

Vestal Community Organization (Second Mondays)

South Knoxville Community Center, 522 Old Maryville Pike

Katherine Johnson, 566-1198

 

Monday, December 14 — 6 p.m.

Fountain City Town Hall Board Meeting (Second Mondays)

Board Meetings: 6 p.m. Monthly

General Membership Meetings: 7 p.m., February, April, September, November

Church of the Good Shepherd, 5337 Jacksboro Pike

Jamie Rowe, 688-9525, ombroligo@aol.com

 

Monday, December 146:30 p.m.

Community Potluck

Historic Fourth & Gill Neighborhood Organization (Second Mondays)

Central United Methodist Church, 210 Third Ave.

Liz Upchurch, 898-1809, lizupchurch1@gmail.com

 

Monday December 146:30 p.m.

Historic Old North Knoxville (Second Mondays)

St. James Episcopal Church, Parish Hall, 1101 N. Broadway

Andie Ray, 548-5221

 

Monday, December 14 — 7 p.m.

Belle Morris Community Action Group (Second Mondays)

City View Baptist Church, 2311 Fine Ave.

http://www.neighborhoodlink.com/Belle_Morris

Rick Wilen, 524-5008

 

Greenway/Alcoa Hwy Info

Hello Everyone!

 

I was hoping you would do me a favor.  Will you tell the Lakemoor Hills group that I will be at the TDOT public meeting this Tuesday (Sevier Heights North Campus from 5pm to 7pm)?  The presentation given that night will be just from TDOT on the highway project but I will have a board there showing a couple of options for the section of Knox Blount Greenway along the UT Ag campus.  Even though this part is further down from your neighborhood we thought there might be an interest from some in the group to have a chance to ask questions or give comments.

 

Thanks!

Shauna Godlevsky

Knox County Parks & Greenways Coordinator

P:  215-6610

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory – Vol. 8, No. 41 – Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015

 

PDF Version: http://bit.ly/NeighborhoodAdvisory2015-12-01

 

  1. Public Meeting Tonight on Brownfield Clean-up
  2. Holiday Events Include Home Tours, Decorating Contest, Parties
  3. Nominate Your Neighbor for the 2016 Good Neighbor of the Year Award
  4. Edgewood Park, Pond Gap Elect Officers
  5. City Council Meeting Date Changed
  6. Better Building Board Meets Thursday
  7. Testify on Blighted Properties at Meeting This Week
  8. Learn about Sevier Avenue Design Plans This Week
  9.  City Sells Parcel for Lonsdale Garden
  10. 10.  Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Published by the City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods to report news important to Knoxville’s residential neighborhoods. News & calendar deadline: 5 p.m. Mondays.

 

  1. Public Meeting Tonight on Brownfield Clean-up

 

The City of Knoxville will conduct a public meeting at 5:30 p.m. this evening (Tuesday, Dec. 1) at All Occasions Catering, 922 N. Central Street, to review the City’s brownfield cleanup grant applications to the Environmental Protection Agency for properties on Jackson Avenue and Broadway.

 

The applications seek up to $200,000 for the former McClung Warehouses and associated properties on West Jackson Avenue between Gay Street and Broadway, as well as the former Sanitary Laundry Property at  625 N. Broadway.

 

The presentations will include a brief overview of the properties, the environmental issues associated with each property, the plan for cleanup activities and the grant application.

 

  1. Holiday Events Include Home Tours, Decorating Contest, Parties

 

Neighborhood and community-based organizations across the city are planning a variety of festive events and service projects this holiday season.

 

Providing opportunities for neighbors to meet and get to know one another is a top priority for successful neighborhood organizations. A strong social bond among neighbors allows an organization to take on tasks and work through controversial issues that might otherwise seem impossible.

 

The Fire Street Lofts Homeowners Association raised $125 and purchased a Honey Baked ham and all the trimmings to give to the firefighters at the downtown station. “Our residents are super grateful for the Fire Department’s service to the city and their willingness to work holidays when others are enjoying family and friends!” noted Ginger Kielarowski. The Fire Street lofts are located on West Jackson Avenue.

 

RiverHill Gateway Neighborhood Association will meet at the Marriott from 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 1, in collaboration with the Global Day of Giving. Music, snacks and beverages will be provided.

 

Five Points Up, a community-based group organized to beautify and unify Five Points and East Knoxville, is hosting its Winter Wonderland event on Thursday, Dec. 3, from 6-7:30 p.m. at Hardy Park and Tabernacle Baptist Church, 2137 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. The event is free to the public and will include vendors, caroling, and holiday treats, as well as holiday lights and décor all around. For more, contact Sarah Bounse at the Knox County Health Department at 215-5187.

 

Historic Old North Knoxville will host its 27th Annual Victorian Holiday Tour of Homes this weekend, and the general public is invited. The Candlelight Tour will occur from 4-9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, followed by an Afternoon Tour onSunday December 6, 12:30-5 p.m. The event showcases nine Victorian and Craftsman style homes plus one historic church decorated for the holidays.

 

Home Tour tickets are now on sale at 15 area Kroger stores and at PayPal via  www.oldnorthknoxville.com. Advance tickets are $10 until midnight on Friday Dec. 4. Day-of-event tickets cost $15 but $10 for seniors. Children under 12 are free with an adult. Pick up programs and ride a shuttle from the ONK ticket booth at the Tennova/St. Mary’s Hospital parking lot on Woodland Avenue.

 

Guests should allow themselves two to three hours to enjoy the event. Some walking is necessary, and some houses have steps. Details and a preview of the homes can be found at www.oldnorthknoxville.com  orwww.facebook.com/ONKhometour.

 

Chilhowee Park Neighborhood Association has announced its Second Annual Holiday Home Decorating Contest, which is free and open to all CPNA residents. Residences that are decorated and with lights turned on will be judged on Tuesday, Dec. 22, from 6-8 p.m. when judges (who are not residents of the neighborhood) make the rounds. Exterior decorations will be judged on originality, theme, and overall curb appeal. Winners will be recognized on the CPNA website, Facebook, and possibly the local newspaper. Feel free to drive through the neighborhood and around Chilhowee Park to check out all the festive lights!

 

Fairmont-Emoriland Neighborhood Association in North Knoxville and Forest Heights Homeowners Associationin West Knoxville will each conduct a holiday homes tour and social gathering for neighborhood residents this coming weekend.

 

The Timbercrest Neighborhood Association will hold its second annual Christmas Party and Tree Lighting at 5 p.m. Dec. 6 (rescheduled from Nov. 29) at the corner of Timber Pass and Timbercrest Trail. There will be music, cookies and hot chocolate. Lights will be turned on at 6 p.m.

 

Also on Dec. 6 (also rescheduled from Nov. 29), Bearden Council will conduct its first ever Bearden tree lighting at the new Everly Brothers Park at the corner of Kingston Pike and North Forest Park Blvd. Friends will gather starting at 5:30 p.m. Santa will attend, the West High School chorus will perform, and the tree lights will be turned on at 6 p.m.

 

Candoro Arts and Heritage Center will hold its annual holiday open house from 4:30-8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 12, at the center, 4450 Candora Drive. There will be refreshments, drawings, music by the Jazzphonics, an art display, and a brief program at 6 p.m. honoring Trudy Monaco, founder of CAHC.

 

Historic Sutherland Heights is holding its usual cookies-and-cake Christmas celebration at 2 p.m. Sunday, December 13, at Marble City Baptist Church, 2738 Sutherland Avenue.

 

Wesley Neighbors Community Association is holding its annual Holiday Dinner at 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 13, at Calhoun’s on Bearden Hill.  Friends and neighbors are welcome. The cost is $20. Mary Pom Claiborne of Knox County Public Library is the guest speaker.  RSVP to johnheins@comcast.net or 297-7045.

 

Alpine Meadow Homeowners Association is having a potluck party for residents on Sunday, Dec. 13, and the group is asking guests to bring a gift or donation for the Tennessee Humane Society. A representative of the Office of Neighborhoods will speak.

 

At its regular monthly meeting at noon on Wednesday, Dec. 16, the Eastport/Lee Williams Neighborhood Watch will celebrate the holiday with gift bags of fruit, nuts, candy, and prizes for adults — and candy, coloring books, surprises, and Teddy Bears for neighboring children.

 

South Knoxville Neighborhood and Business Coalition — composed of representatives of neighborhood organizations and the South Knoxville Alliance — once again is planning a holiday party at a member’s home.

 

  1. Nominate Your Neighbor for the 2016 Good Neighbor of the Year Award

 

What makes a good neighbor?

 

Is it just someone who keeps up his property and minds his own business? Or is it that outgoing person who takes time to chat and offers you a tomato from her summer garden? Is it the person who drives an elderly neighbor to and from the doctor’s office — or perhaps the neighbor who always shows up at neighborhood cleanup events?

 

Good neighbors are friendly and helpful, respect the privacy of others, drive at a reasonable speed through the neighborhood, take responsibility for their children and pets, pitch in when needed, and watch out for others.

 

In Knoxville, we celebrate good neighbors with the Diana Conn Neighbor of the Year Award.

 

Nominations are now being accepted for this award, which is presented annually to a City of Knoxville resident who — in the spirit of cooperation and with commitment to inclusive community — has devoted time and talent in service to his or her neighbors and neighborhood.

 

A committee made up of Neighborhood Advisory Council members will select the winner, who (along with other finalists) will be announced at the 2016 Neighborhood Awards and Networking Luncheon on Saturday, March 5, 2016, at the Knoxville Convention Center.

 

Who in your neighborhood deserves this award?

 

To learn more, visit www.knoxvilletn.gov/neighborhoods and click on Good Neighbor of the Year Award. Or justdownload the form. The form is easy to fill out. Just use your own words to describe the person you wish to honor.

 

The deadline for nominations is Friday, Dec. 18, at 4:30 p.m.  The nominations can be sent to Debbie Sharp by email to dsharp@knoxvilletn.gov or by mail to Office of Neighborhoods – Room 528, City of Knoxville, P.O. Box 1631, Knoxville, TN 37901. Or call Debbie to receive a hard copy of the form in the mail.

 

The award was named for the late Diana Conn and was presented to her posthumously at the 2013 Neighborhood Conference. The next two winners were Betty Jo Mahan in 2014 and Rita Schwartz in 2015.

 

  1. Edgewood Park, Pond Gap Elect Officers

 

The Edgewood Park Neighborhood Association held annual elections at its November 17 meeting.  Pete Pallesen will continue as president. Michael Duerr was elected vice-president; Julie Taylor was re-elected corresponding and recording secretary; and Carol Zimmerman was re-elected treasurer.

 

Pond Gap Neighborhood Association elected new officers for the next two-year term, 2016-2017. The president will remain David Williams; the vice president will be Jill McKenzie, who replaces Pete Waggoner; and the Secretary will be Betty Williams, who replaces Susan Waggoner. Russell Hall and Jackie Bonvin will be co-chairs of the Beautification Committee.

 

  1. City Council Meeting Date Changed

 

Due to the winter holidays, Knoxville City Council has rescheduled its Dec. 22 meeting to Thursday, Dec. 17. Council’sDec. 8 and Dec. 17 meetings will be the last ones for the year. See http://knoxvilletn.gov/government/city_council to review the Council members, meeting schedule, current and past agendas, and other Council information.

 

  1. Better Building Board Meets Thursday

 

Two properties are on the agenda for this week’s Better Building Board (BBB) meeting at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, December 3, in the Small Assembly Room of the City County Building.

 

The City’s Community Development Department is recommending that the properties at 507 Hickory Drive including accessory structure (Parcel ID 068J-C-027) and 3738 Speedway Circle (Parcel ID 082D-D-030) be determined blighted.

 

Neighbors affected by these properties may wish to be present to testify on their impact on the neighborhood.

 

For a full copy of the December BBB agenda, with details and owner information on each property, visithttp://knoxvilletn.gov/government/boards_commissions and click on the Better Building Board.

 

Under the city’s Chronic Problem Properties ordinance, a property first determined and then later certified by the BBB to be blighted can eventually be acquired by the City, using its eminent domain powers, if the owner fails to take corrective action.

 

Blighted properties acquired by the city are listed for sale through Community Development’s Homemaker’s Program. See:

http://knoxvilletn.gov/government/city_departments_offices/community_development/homemaker_program/

 

  1. Testify on Blighted Properties at Meeting This Week

 

Twenty-one properties are on the agenda for the City’s next Public Officer Hearing at 9:30 a.m. Friday, December 4.

 

The Public Officer — David Brace, senior director of public works — will hear testimony on buildings that inspectors contend are in violation of the city’s building codes. Testimony can also be made by the property owners, neighbors, neighborhood groups, and other stakeholders, such as lien holders.

 

The Public Officer then decides whether to issue an order requiring that the violations be addressed within a certain period of time. Failure by the owner to cure the problem may result in the boarding or demolition of a structure, or the cleanup of a dirty or overgrown lot, with costs billed to the owner. A property owner may appeal the Public Officer’s decision to the Better Building Board and, ultimately, to Chancery Court.

 

The properties to be heard for repair/demolition orders are: 121 East Caldwell Avenue (including accessory structure), 1404 Chicago Avenue, 1025 Durmast Drive (including accessory structure), 2038 East Fifth Avenue, 1606 East Glenwood Avenue, 2513 Harvey Street a/k/a accessory structure at 432/434 East Morelia Avenue, 1248 Iredell Avenue (including accessory structure), 1111 Louisiana Avenue, 2128 Mississippi Avenue (including accessory structure, 1405 Rickard Drive (including accessory structure), 2208 Southside Drive, 3738 Speedway Circle, 1615 Sterchi Street (including accessory structure), 1217 University Avenue, 708 Washburn Road a/k/a 704 Washburn Road, and 2721 White Oak Lane (including accessory structure).

 

The structures at 2111 Citrus Street, 2115 Citrus Street, 141 South Cruze Street, 2005 Forest Avenue, and 205 Green Road (including accessory structure) will be considered for confirmation of previously issued emergency repair/demolition orders.

 

If any of these properties are in your neighborhood, then you or a representative of your organization may wish to attend the meeting to submit testimony about the impact of the property on the neighborhood.

 

The full December 4 agenda, with details on each property, can be found at http://www.knoxvilletn.gov/UserFile/Servers/Server_109478/File/Boards/betterbuilding/agenda_poh.pdf.

 

  1. Learn about Sevier Avenue Design Plans Next Week

 

Representatives from the City of Knoxville’s Office of Redevelopment and Engineering Department along with consultant Vaughn and Melton will hold a public meeting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 10, to review final design plans for the Sevier Avenue Streetscapes Improvement Project. The meeting will be held at South Knoxville Elementary School.

 

Proposed improvements for Sevier Avenue include a new two-lane streetscape with bike lanes, improved sidewalks, street lighting, on-street parking and a new roundabout at the Sevier Avenue, Island Home Avenue and Foggy Bottom Street intersections.

 

Streetscape improvements are also planned for Barber and Foggy Bottom streets and will provide connectivity to the new Waterfront Drive and Suttree Landing Park.

 

Improvements are also planned for Davenport Road and Phillips Avenue in the vicinity of South Knoxville Elementary to provide better traffic circulation and pedestrian connections to the school.

 

There will be a two-week public comment period after the Dec. 10 meeting.

 

  1. City Sells Parcel for Lonsdale Garden

 

A nonprofit group is creating a community garden in Lonsdale that will offer plots to local families, as well as fruit trees and berry bushes that will provide produce for the whole community.

 

City Council on Oct. 27 approved the sale of a parcel at 1229 Louisiana Ave. to Thrive Lonsdale, a nonprofit organization that serves children in the neighborhood. The organization plans to convert the parcel of land into a community garden.

 

“We are so excited to be working with the City’s urban agriculture initiative and to be providing the Lonsdale community with a place to steward their gifts,” said Beth Aaser, Thrive Lonsdale’s garden director.

 

The lot was sold to Thrive Lonsdale through the City Community Development Department’s Homemaker Program, which makes vacant, often dilapidated properties available for sale to nonprofit organizations, for-profit businesses, private developers and individuals with the stipulation that the owner rehabilitates the existing structure, builds a new dwelling or maintains the vacant lot.

 

“In this case, the parcel is unbuildable, so a neighborhood garden is a perfect use for this vacant lot,” said Becky Wade, City Community Development Director.

 

Aaser added: “Our desire is to see an abandoned lot turned into a beautiful and welcoming space. Functionally, this garden will house raised garden beds for 20 local families along with communal fruit trees and berry bushes.”

 

The garden is centrally located in the middle of Lonsdale, directly across from Lonsdale Elementary School. Some citizens had requested that the lot be used for overflow parking for the elementary school, but neither the zoning nor the Homemakers Program guidelines would have allowed that use.

 

For more information or to find out how to donate money, materials or labor, visit www.thrivelonsdale.com.

 

  1. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Include your neighborhood-related event or meeting in this space. Call 215-4382.

 

Visit http://knoxvilletn.gov/calendar for a complete list of meetings of various city boards and commissions.

 

If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to attend a City of Knoxville public meeting, please contact Stephanie Brewer Cook at scook@knoxvilletn.gov or 215-2034 no lessthan 72 hours prior to the meeting you wish to attend. For an English interpreter, contact Joshalyn Hundley, Title VI Coordinator, at 865.215.3867 or at jhundley@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

Tuesday, December 1 — 4:30 p.m.

Dandridge Avenue Neighborhood Watch (First Tuesdays)

Beck Cultural Exchange Center, 1927 Dandridge Ave.

Lawrence Washington, 524-4498

 

Tuesday, December 1 — 6 p.m.

            Mechanicsville Community Association (First Tuesdays)

Fairview Recreation Center, 1628 Dora St.

Charles Wright, 637-1802

 

Wednesday, December 2 — Breakfast – 7:30 a.m.  Meeting – 8 a.m.

East Towne Area Business & Professional Association (First Wednesdays)

Neighborhood Residents and Leaders encouraged to attend

New Harvest Park Community Building

Chair, Justin Sterling, JSterling@simon.com

 

Wednesday, December 2 — 5 p.m.

Knox County Board of Education – Regular Session (First Wednesdays)

First Floor Board Room, Andrew Johnson Building, 912 South Gay St.

For agenda, work sessions, and other items:

Visit http://knoxschools.org. Click on “Board of Education.”

 

Thursday, December 33:30 p.m.

Better Building Board

(Last Thursday, January-October. First Thursday, December)

Small Assembly Room, City-County Building

http://www.knoxvilletn.gov/government/boards_commissions/better_building_board/

Cheri Hollifield, 215-2119, chollifield@knoxvilletn.gov

 

Thursday, December 36-7:30 p.m.

Winter Wonderland Celebration

Caroling, holiday treats, Christmas lights, and vendors. Free to the public.

Five PointsUp

Tabernacle Baptist Church and Hardy Park, 2137 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.

Terrell Patrick, 525-4833

 

Friday, December 4 — 9:30 a.m.

Public Officer Hearing – Neighborhood Codes Enforcement

(Usually held on the Friday following Better Building Board meetings)

The PO considers action on violations of city’s building codes.

Small Assembly Room, City County Building

http://www.knoxvilletn.gov/government/boards_commissions/better_building_board/

Cheri Hollifield, 215-2119, chollifield@knoxvilletn.gov

 

Saturday, December 5 and Sunday, December 6

Historic Old North Knoxville Victorian Holiday Home Tour

Saturday Dec. 5: 4-9 p.m. (Candlelight Tour)

Sunday Dec. 6:  12:30-5 p.m. (Afternoon Tour)

Tickets $10 in advanced or $15 day of event – can be purchased online or at Kroger

Lauren Rider, 964-3905, http://www.victorianholidayhometour.com/

 

Sunday, December 6 – 5 p.m.

2nd Annual Timbercrest Christmas Party and Tree Lighting

Corner of Timber Pass and Timbercrest Trail

Music, cookies, hot chocolate — and tree lighting at 6 p.m.

Timbercrest Neighborhood Association

Jen Leadbetter, ljleadbetter@yahoo.com, 292-3437

 

Sunday, December 65:30 p.m.

Christmas Tree Lighting in Everly Brothers Park

Santa, West High School Chorus, and tree lighting at 6 p.m.

Kingston Pike at N. Forest Park Blvd.

Bearden Council

Terry Faulkner, terryfaulk@bellsouth.net, 584-3659

Lost Dog

Neighbors-

Medium/Large sized dog seen wandering along Maloney.  Invisible fence collar?  Maybe broke out of yard.  No ID.  Black head/shoulders with sort of spotted grey body.  First seen Maloney & Lakecrest, next seen Maloney & Circle Lake.

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory – Vol. 8, No. 39 – Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015

 

PDF Version: http://bit.ly/NeighborhoodAdvisory2015-11-10

 

  1. Mayor Rogero to Meet with Neighborhood Advisory Council
  2. Community Meeting to Focus on Paul Hogue Park
  3. Workshop Next Week: What Makes a Great Neighborhood?
  4. City Seeks Slide Shows for 2016 Neighborhood Luncheon
  5. Broadway Stakeholders Grapple with Corridor Challenges
  6. Plans for Central Street to be Unveiled Thursday
  7. BZA Decisions Can Impact Your Neighborhood
  8. Advocate to Address Effects of Domestic Violence on Children and Youth
  9. Use Your Driving Skills to Assist Seniors
  10. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Published by the City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods to report news important to Knoxville’s residential neighborhoods. News & calendar deadline: 5 p.m. Mondays.

 

  1. Mayor Rogero to Meet with Neighborhood Advisory Council

 

Mayor Madeline Rogero will meet with the Neighborhood Advisory Council (NAC) beginning at 4:30 p.m.Wednesday, Nov. 11, at the Cansler Family YMCA, 616 Jessamine Street.

 

The Mayor will make some brief remarks and then discuss neighborhood issues and concerns with the NAC members. Neighborhood leaders and other members of the public are invited to attend.

 

Appointed by the Mayor, the NAC includes a total of 15 members — two from each City Council district and three at large. The NAC’s mission is to 1) give advice and feedback on the programs and policies of the Office of Neighborhoods,  2) bring neighborhood issues and concerns to the attention of the city administration, 3) propose responses and solutions to address these concerns; and 4) serve as a sounding board for city initiatives and proposals affecting neighborhoods.

 

For more, see www.knoxvilletn.gov/neighborhoods and click on Advisory Council.

 

  1. Community Meeting to Focus on Paul Hogue Park

 

A community meeting for residents in the Five Points community will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12, at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 600 S. Chestnut Street.

 

The meeting will focus on safety and security issues at Paul Hogue Park (known locally as Chestnut Street Park), and the surrounding area.

 

Several city officials will be on hand, including Captain Kenny Miller, commander of East District Patrol for the Knoxville Police Department; Ernie Pierce, a traffic engineer in the city’s Engineering Department; and Joe Walsh, director of Parks & Recreation.

 

The meeting has been organized by members of the immediate community, including Chelle Neal, who can be reached at 313-4368 or ms.michelleneal@gmail.com.

 

  1. Workshop Next Week: What Makes a Great Neighborhood?

 

The Office of Neighborhoods and the Knox County Health Department are partnering to host a community workshop next week, focusing on what makes a great and healthy neighborhood.

 

In addition, the workshop will show how community members can work with available resources to create places of beauty and pride in their own neighborhoods.

 

During the workshop, residents will learn about strategies to work on these efforts and brainstorm together to come up with innovative ideas of their own. Presenters will include Sarah Bounse, Public Health Educator from the Knox County Health Department, and Susan Shin, AmeriCorps member at the City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods.

 

The workshop is open to everyone and will be held Thursday, Nov. 19, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Cansler YMCA, 616 Jessamine Street. Light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP by contacting Susan Shin at 215-3077 or sshin@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

  1. City Seeks Slide Shows for 2016 Neighborhood Luncheon

 

The Office of Neighborhoods is seeking slide show presentations to be made at the Neighborhood Awards and Networking Luncheon on March 5, 2016.

 

Presentations can focus on a creative neighborhood project or event, a program that addressed a neighborhood challenge, or a larger community project that benefitted nearby neighborhoods. Proposals will be considered from individuals, neighborhood groups, governmental agencies, civic groups, nonprofits and businesses.

 

Preference will be given to presentations that have been successful and have inspired others to improve their neighborhoods and community.

 

Please submit a brief description of your proposed presentation to Debbie Sharp no later than Monday, Nov. 16. Send to dsharp@knoxvilletn.gov or Office of Neighborhoods, City of Knoxville, P.O. Box 1631, Knoxville, TN 37901. If you need more time to submit your ideas, just call Debbie at 215-4382.  (Actual slide shows will be due at a later date.)

 

A committee of neighborhood leaders will review the proposals and select the winning ideas.

 

  1. Broadway Stakeholders Grapple with Corridor Challenges

 

Over 70 neighborhood leaders, property owners, and business representatives last week huddled with government officials and other stakeholders to re-imagine the Broadway Corridor between Fifth Avenue and I-640.

 

For details about this three-hour event, see www.knoxvilletn.gov/neighborhoods and click on the Office of Neighborhoods Blog.

 

  1. Plans for Central Street to be Unveiled Thursday

 

The City of Knoxville will hold a public meeting at 5:30 p.m. this Thursday, Nov. 12, to discuss a $3.3 million infrastructure upgrade project for a 12-block section of North Central Street between Magnolia Avenue and Woodland Avenue.

 

All stakeholders, including businesses and nearby neighborhoods, are invited to attend the meeting at All Occasion Catering, 922 N. Central Street.

 

The project, which will begin next spring, will include the repair and replacement of sections of sidewalks, new curbs, “bulb outs” and other features to improve pedestrian safety; better-defined on-street parking; better-marked bike lanes; storm water and utility improvements; resurfacing; and landscaping.

 

The work — funded jointly by the City, the Tennessee Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration — is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2017.

 

“One unique aspect will be a linear park at Baxter Avenue and Central Street, which will serve as a gateway to Historic Happy Holler,” said Redevelopment Deputy Director Anne Wallace.

 

“Central will truly be a ‘complete street’,” Wallace added. “We’ll be reducing the amount of asphalt in favor of increasing green space. These improvements will make the corridor more inviting and create safer options for people who are walking, parking vehicles or bicycling.”

 

  1. BZA Decisions Can Impact Your Neighborhood

 

Nine properties are on the agenda for next week’s meeting of the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA).

 

Established by city ordinance, BZA hears appeals of denials of building permits by the city’s Building Inspections Department. The board, consisting of five citizens appointed by the Mayor, meets at 4 p.m. on the third Thursdayof each month in the Small Assembly Room of the City County Building.

 

BZA meets next Thursday, Nov. 19. Addresses on the agenda include 5800 Clinton Highway, 1421 Southgate Road, 1612 Elm Street, 227 E. Anderson Avenue, 6215 Enterprise Drive, 6909 Quail Drive, 209 E. Anderson Avenue, 714 W. Hill Avenue, and 2701 Spence Place.

 

Keep up with how the BZA might impact your neighborhood. Watch for the black and white signs indicating that there is a pending decision on a particular piece of property. Most signs are for Metropolitan Planning Commission issues — which are also important — but signs with the word “variance” are BZA items.

 

The BZA agenda is posted on the city website. Browse to www.knoxvilletn.gov/boards and click on Board of Zoning Appeals. The agenda is posted no later than the Monday prior to the BZA meeting each month.

 

A neighborhood group that keeps track of BZA will call the Plans Review & Inspections Department at 215-3669 to request and study the paperwork on a particular appeal, decide whether to take a position on the appeal, and then attend the BZA meeting to voice the group’s support or objections. A group can also request a postponement to allow time to meet with the applicant.

 

Decisions of the BZA can be appealed within 15 days of the BZA decision to Knoxville City Council. Appeals of a City Council decision are made to Chancery Court within 60 days of a City Council decision related to BZA.

  1. Advocate to Address Effects of Domestic Violence on Children and Youth

 

Jennifer Rose, MSW — a national and international advocate for ending violence against women and children — will speak in Knoxville on Friday, Nov. 20, from 8:30 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. at the Phyllis Wheatley Center, located at 124 South Cruze Street in East Knoxville.

 

This training is being presented by Game Changers, a YWCA program geared toward middle school boys that teaches about domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, and about how they can help prevent violence against women and girls.

 

Register here for this free event. If you have questions or have trouble getting

registered, contact Hanna Brinson at 523-6126 or hbrinson@ywcaknox.com.

 

  1. Use Your Driving Skills to Assist Seniors

 

CAC — the Knoxville/Knox County Community Action Committee — is seeking volunteer drivers in its “Volunteer Assisted Transportation” program, which assists Knox County seniors and people with disabilities who require aid and assistance to travel safely.

 

Volunteers transport seniors to medical appointments, shopping trips, beauty appointments, and other activities. They also assist with communication challenges, filling out paperwork, helping the rider in and out of the vehicle, etc.

 

Volunteers drive agency-owned, hybrid sedans or wheelchair accessible mini-vans and receive training to include First Aid & CPR certification.  Volunteers are needed for weekdays, evenings and weekends.  For more information, please call 865-673-5001 or email nancy.welch@cactrans.org.

 

  1. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory

Neighborhood Advisory – Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015

Inbox x

David Massey <dmassey@knoxvilletn.gov>

4:01 PM (3 hours ago)
to

Knoxville Neighborhood Advisory – Vol. 8, No. 38 – Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015

 

PDF Version: http://bit.ly/NeighborhoodAdvisory2015-11-3

 

  1. Parkridge Elects Board Members, Officers
  2. Fountain City Town Hall to Host Medical Center Security Dogs
  3. Nominate the Good Neighbor of the Year
  4. Home for Sale in Homemaker Program
  5. Thursday Session Aims to Enhance Broadway Corridor
  6. Mayor Encourages Citizens to Consider Health Insurance Options
  7. Summit to Address Accessibility, Mobility, Livability
  8. City, Partners to Offer Resources for Landlords
  9. Reminder: Check Your Smoke Alarms
  10. South Knoxville Alliance sponsors Micro Fundraising Event
  11. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Published by the City of Knoxville’s Office of Neighborhoods to report news important to Knoxville’s residential neighborhoods. News & calendar deadline: 5 p.m. Mondays.

 

  1. Parkridge Elects Board Members, Officers

 

Parkridge Community Organization (PCO) held its annual elections this week and returned eight board members to subsequent one-year terms.

 

Returning board members are David Anderson, Tanner Jessel, Jennie Mezick, Jennifer Montgomery, David Nix, Seanna Rupe, Zachary Smith and Lynne Sullivan. Christopher Salmons was elected to the ninth board post.

 

David Anderson and Seanna Rupe were reelected president and secretary, respectively. Jennifer Montgomery succeeds Calvin Chappelle as vice president. Chappelle stepped down from the board but said he will remain active in the organization. Lynne Sullivan was elected treasurer, succeeding Zachary Smith, who remains on the board but was term limited as treasurer.

 

A representative of the Office of Neighborhoods conducted the election for the organization.

 

In addition, PCO celebrated another successful Tour of Homes, which was held last Sunday. Chappelle said the group will continue to hold the event each fall around Halloween.

 

  1. Fountain City Town Hall to Host Medical Center Security Dogs

 

Security dogs will be the featured attraction at Fountain City Town Hall’s general membership meeting at 7 p.m. this coming Monday, Nov. 9, at Church of the Good Shepherd, 5337 Jacksboro Pike.

 

The dogs are members of the K-9 security unit at the University of Tennessee Medical Center, which introduced the program last year to help address security needs at the sprawling facility. Medical Center officers will discuss aspects of the training for the canine unit as well as the unit’s importance at the hospital.

 

The Fountain City Town Hall board meets at the church on the second Monday of every month starting at 6 p.m. General membership meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of February, April, September and November. For more, contact Jamie Rowe atombroligo@aol.com or 688-9525.

 

  1. Nominate the Good Neighbor of the Year

 

Nominations are now being accepted for the Diana Conn Good Neighbor of the Year Award, which is presented annually to a City of Knoxville resident who — in the spirit of cooperation and with commitment to inclusive community — has devoted time and talent in service to his or her neighbors and neighborhood.

 

A committee made up of Neighborhood Advisory Council members will select the winner, who (along with other finalists) will be announced at the 2016 Neighborhood Awards and Networking Luncheon on Saturday, March 5, 2016, at the Knoxville Convention Center.

 

Who in your neighborhood deserves this award?

 

To learn more about the award, visit www.knoxvilletn.gov/neighborhoods and click on Good Neighbor of the Year Award. Or just download the form.

 

The deadline for nominations is Friday, Dec. 18, at 4:30 p.m.  The nominations can be sent to Debbie Sharp by email todsharp@knoxvilletn.gov or by mail to Office of Neighborhoods – Room 528, City of Knoxville, P.O. Box 1631, Knoxville, TN 37901.

 

The award was named for the late Diana Conn and was presented to her posthumously at the 2013 Neighborhood Conference. The next two winners were Betty Jo Mahan in 2014 and Rita Schwartz in 2015.

 

  1. Home for Sale in Homemaker Program

 

The City of Knoxville has recently listed another home for sale in the Community Development Department’s Homemaker Program.

 

The ranch style single family home is located at 177 Chickamauga Avenue in the Oakwood- Lincoln Park neighborhood near Sharp’s Ridge Memorial Park. The 3-bedroom, one-bath, 880-square-foot house was built in 2004.

 

Under the Homemaker Program, the City offers vacant lots and lots with substandard structures for sale to individuals, non-profit organizations and businesses. These properties were identified by the City for acquisition to further its mission to remove blight, redevelop neighborhoods and provide affordable housing opportunities.

 

The purchaser will be required, in almost all cases, to construct a new dwelling on vacant parcels or rehabilitate existing structures.

 

Individuals can make an offer on a property by submitting an application. The sales agreement includes a provision that allows the City to take the property back if the new owner fails to make improvements to the property per guidelines.

 

For a copy of the application, along with other details about the program, see:

http://knoxvilletn.gov/government/city_departments_offices/community_development/homemaker_program/

 

  1. Thursday Session Aims to Enhance Broadway Corridor

 

A “design charrette” organized by the East Tennessee Community Design Center will be held from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. this coming Thursday, Nov. 5, in the fellowship hall of St. James Episcopal Church, 1101 North Broadway.

 

Participants will include Broadway property owners, businesses, and other stakeholders, as well as residents of neighborhoods bordering Broadway between Fifth Avenue and I-640, designers, planners and government officials.

 

Seating is limited. If you wish to participate, please contact Leslie Fawaz, studio design director at the Design Center, at 525-9945 orleslie@communitydc.org.

 

At the charrette, there will be a 30-minute input period followed by a 90-minute break-out session. Designers and planners will work with North Broadway stakeholders to address challenges such as parking problems and the lack of any unifying landscaping along the corridor. The break-out groups will then get back together to share their findings.

 

The results of the charrette will influence the Broadway Corridor Enhancement Plan that will be developed through the Design Center and that will analyze existing conditions, assess shortcomings, and develop demonstrative solutions that can be implemented throughout the corridor.

 

  1. Mayor Encourages Citizens to Consider Health Insurance Options 

 

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero is urging citizens who need health insurance to check out their options under the Affordable Care Act. Open enrollment began November 1 and will run through January.

 

Locally, the Tennessee Health Care Campaign is hosting events where trained volunteers help citizens with the enrollment process. This applies not only to those who have no health insurance currently, but also to those who want to compare current coverage with options that may be available to them in the Health Insurance Marketplace.

 

Sign-up events will be held at South Knoxville Community Center and Cherokee Health System on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue. For appointment or best walk-in time, call (844) 644-5443.

 

For more details, see these web sites: www.knoxvilletn.gov/affordablecareact/, http://www.getcoveredtenn.org/, andhttps://www.healthcare.gov/.

 

  1. Summit to Address Accessibility, Mobility, Livability

 

The upcoming Knoxville Livability Summit has been designed to appeal to seniors, persons with disabilities, family members or friends; members of design,  construction, and business firms; government officials and other community leaders.

 

Livable communities allow all people to maintain independence and quality of life through economic prosperity, built and natural environments, affordable and accessible housing, adequate mobility options and engagement in civic and social life.

 

The Knoxville Livability Summit, sponsored by the City of Knoxville, the Knoxville-Knox County CAC Office on Aging, and the Tennessee Commission on Aging and Disability (TCAD), will be held on Thursday, Nov. 12, from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Rothchild Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike. The cost is $25 per person.

 

Click here to register and to read more about the workshops. For more, call Nancy Lofaro at 524-2786 or Stephanie Cook at 215-2034, or email Cook at scook@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

  1. City, Partners to Offer Resources for Landlords

 

The City of Knoxville and other partners have scheduled a “Landlord Summit” to provide landlords with information on topics ranging from weatherization and lead testing to Section 8 rental assistance and affordable housing for veterans.

 

The free gathering will be held from 8 a.m. until 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, at O’Connor Senior Center, 611 Winona Street. A continental breakfast will be served at 7:30 a.m., and no registration is necessary. Mayor Madeline Rogero will make opening remarks.

 

Various presenters will discuss the new program to weatherize rental housing; how to get rental units tested, abated and certified as lead free; ways to house homeless veterans; details about participation in the Section 8 rental program and other social services; and need-to-know details about fair housing regulations and the state’s landlord/tenant act.

 

In addition to the city, partners in this event include CAC (Knoxville – Knox County Community Action Committee), Legal Aid of East Tennessee, KCDC (Knoxville’s public housing agency), the Tennessee Human Rights Commission, the Knoxville Knox County Homeless Coalition, and Volunteers of America.

 

For more, contact Michael Dunthorn at 215-3103 or mdunthorn@knoxvilletn.gov.

 

  1. Reminder: Check Your Smoke Alarms

 

The Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s office suggests using this past weekend’s change from daylight savings to standard time as a reminder to check your smoke alarms.

 

It is suggested that you test your alarms monthly, but with hectic schedules that can be hard to remember. So, use this time now and then again in the spring as a reminder to test your alarms and replace the batteries. If the detector is more than 10 years old, the whole unit should be replaced.

 

Every home, the fire marshal says, should have a smoke alarm on each floor and in living quarters to be most effective in notifying residents of a fire. Also, make sure everyone in the home knows what the alarm sounds like and what the plan is, should it ever go off.

 

The Knoxville Fire Department has a Smoke Alarm Program for those in single family homes who need assistance installing alarms. Visithttp://knoxvilletn.gov/kfd and click on ‘Smoke Alarm Program’ — or call 311 or 865-215-4311.

 

  1. South Knoxville Alliance Sponsors Micro Fundraising Event

 

South Knoxville Alliance (SKA) — a business and professional association — will hold its third Knoxville SOUP, a micro-funding event and dinner, starting at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5, at Woodlawn Christian Church, 4339 Woodlawn Pike.

 

The suggested donation is $5.00, but more can be given. All donations go to the project winner at the end of the evening. Proposals will be presented at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner and then the announcement of the winner.

 

The project presenters will be Vestal School Pottery, Family Friendly Drum Circle at Ijams, South Knoxville Elementary Scientists in the Library, and Joe Hill Roadshow.

 

Previously this event has supported the rejuvenation of the Mary Vestal Park and Greenway Extension, and the South Knox Food Co-op. For more, email soup@SouthKnoxvilleAlliance.org or call 865-309-4020.

 

  1. Neighborhood and Government Calendar

 

Include your neighborhood-related event or meeting in this space. Call 215-4382.

 

Visit http://knoxvilletn.gov/calendar for a complete list of meetings of various city boards and commissions.